Participating Insurance

Diagnostic Services

Appointments are necessary.
Hours: 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Monday thru Friday

Nuclear Medicine

What is Nuclear Medicine?

The patient is injected with or swallows a small amount of radioactive material. It doesn’t harm the patient or the people around the patient. This radioactive material enables a special camera to detect problems within the patient’s body, including fractures, certain types of cancer and problems with organs.

What to Expect During Your Exam

Depending on the type of exam, the procedure may take anywhere from 30 minutes to 90 minutes.

When you arrive for the exam you will be asked to remove metal items that could interfere with the scan, but all clothing can remain on.

Most of the procedures require an injection into a vein. The injected material is radioactive, but doesn’t cause side effects. It should be noted that the lowest possible dose of radiation is used to achieve a diagnostic image.

You will then be asked to lie down on the imaging table while the camera is positioned over a region of your body. Once an image is acquired, it is recorded for a Radiologist to review.

After the exam, the radiologist will prepare a report for your Doctor. Depending on the time of the procedure, patients can usually call their Doctor’s office the same day for results.

Nuclear Medicine Examinations Available at RMRI

  • Bone Scan
  • HIDA Scan
  • Gastric Emptying
  • Thyroid Uptake
  • Parathyroid
  • Renal
  • Ceretec WBC
  • MUGA
  • Liver/Spleen

Please ask us about additional tests that may also be available.

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Preparing for Your Visit

General Instructions:
Patients should plan to arrive 15 minutes before their scheduled appointment.

Please bring a form of photo identification, any prescriptions from your physician, referrals, insurance information, and any medical records that have been requested. Before scheduling your appointment please contact your healthcare insurance carrier for preauthorization if needed.

Below are some general guidelines to help patients prepare for their exam. Many procedures require patients to follow specific instructions beforehand. Those instructions are given to each patient and confirmed via phone by one of our staff members before their appointment.
Always follow the instructions provided specifically for you.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your procedure and how to prepare for it, please call our office at 610-691-8931.

Preparing for Your Exam:
We recommend wearing clothing free of metal in the area being scanned. This includes clothes that have zippers, metal buttons or snaps.

Depending on the type of exam you are having, you may be asked to avoid eating and drinking 4 hours prior to the exam. Each procedure is different and instructions are given to each patient and confirmed via phone by one of our staff members before their appointment.

  • Steps you make be asked to take in preparation and during your exam, include:
  • Bone Scan
    • Since the injected radioactive material needs time to be absorbed by your bones, usually you can leave after the injection without experiencing side effects or restrictions, and be asked to return in 3 hours for the scan.
  • HIDA Scan
    • Nothing to eat or drink 4 hours before this exam.
    • When you arrive, a technologist willl start an IV and inject the patient with a radioactive material.
    • You will be asked to lie down on the imaging table for approximately 90 minutes.
  • Gastric Emptying
    • Nothing to eat or drink 4 hours before this exam.
    • When you arrive, you will be asked to eat a hard boiled egg that has been injected with a radioactive material.
    • Ten pictures will be taken of your stomach at ten minute intervals. This exam will take approximately 2 hours.
  • Thyroid Uptake
    • Nothing to eat or drink 4 hours before this exam.
    • When you arrive, you will be asked to swallow a pill containing radioactive Iodine.
    • Three appointment times are necessary for a complete evaluation and the appointment times must be at precise intervals, 6 hours and 24 hours apart.

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